We have created this Blog and the database to provide a place where the scientific community can share and update the fast growing knowledge and data on the study of greenhouse gas CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes in Africa.

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Krüger et al. 2013. Greenhouse gas emission peaks following natural rewetting of two wetlands in the southern Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg Park, South Africa

Krüger, J.P., Beckedahl, H., Gerold, G., Jungkunst, H.F., Greenhouse gas emission peaks following natural rewetting of two wetlands in the southern Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg Park, South Africa. South African Geographical Journal, DOI:10.1080/03736245.2013.847798

Abstract

The global importance of wetlands in the carbon and nitrogen cycles is well documented, but the specific greenhouse gas characteristics of South African wetlands are less well known. These wetlands most likely differ from more prominent wetlands from continuously humid climate zone (boreal, temperate and tropics). Particular wetlands in the southern Drakensberg are adapted to the seasonal drying during the winter months. Greenhouse gas emissions were measured during natural rewetting at two wetlands. A rapid reaction and significant positive correlation between greenhouse gas fluxes and ground water level were determined. Methane emissions were observed after two days of rewetting at one of the wetlands, and nitrous oxide emissions started within a day of rewetting at the other wetland. The high nitrous oxide emissions may be caused by the recent winter burning of vegetation, which most likely resulted in a greater availability of nitrogen in the soil. High nitrous oxide emissions following natural rewetting (the annual cyclical process in these wetlands) could contribute significantly to the local greenhouse gas budget. Hence, besides the methane emissions, the nitrous oxide emissions of wetlands in southern Africa should be taken into account.

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